#Scotstober Day 11 #Bourach

Today’s word is bourach. Bourach means heap, crowd; muddle, confusion, mess.

Here’s my response to today’s prompt (another wee snippet taken from Running The Asset):

Elle stappit throu the entry an jeelt. The hoosie wis malafoostert. Faem an stuffin skailt fae screeds in the sofa an muckle chairs. Papers plowt fae the offish intae the living room leavin a skirvin o papers lik confetti ower the flair. The offish neuk in the faur cunyie wis disnanuled.

A wechtie ba o dreid heft laich in hir wame. Rosa cuidnae hae been hame, she wuid hae focht thaim. But, hoo cuid Elle ken in is bourach?

And now in English.

Elle stepped through the door and froze. The apartment was trashed. Foam and stuffing spilt from slashes in the sofa and armchairs. Papers cascaded from the office into the living room leaving a coating of papers like confetti over the floor. The office nook in the far corner was obliterated.

A heavy ball of dread settled low in her belly. Rosa couldn’t have been home, she would have fought them. Except, how could Elle know in this mess?

This is a more word-for-word translation than the previous one.

Author: Susan T. Braithwaite

Royal Navy veteran from Scotland. My journey into writing started with a screenwriting certificate program at UCLA Ext. Since then, I've worked as a freelance content writer, erotica author, proofreader, professional beta reader, and content editor. I'm now working hard on my dream writing career: romantic suspense author. When I'm not writing, I can be found drinking too much coffee, obsessing over yarn, and planning world domination with my husband, jezbraithwaite.blog, and our squirrel army.​

7 thoughts on “#Scotstober Day 11 #Bourach”

  1. OK that was way beyond my reading in any way sensible or made sense once I hit “jeelt. The hoosie wis malafoostert. Faem an stuffin skailt fae screeds in the sofa an muckle ” although I did get hoosie 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Brian! Thanks for the comment.
      Some of the difficulty came from me and Grammarly in the English translation section.

      First there were some fragments from an earlier translation that I ditched, but forgot to delete, and in the newer version I tried to capture the essence and flow of what the Scots says, then Grammarly came in and “helped” it flow better in English.

      But, I’ve now changed the translation to a more word-for-word translation as much as I could.

      Hopefully, it’s a bit easier to understand. 🤞👍

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.