Things in Scots: Running the Asset Edition – Morra

Welcome to the second post in the revamped Things in Scots series. In this incarnation of TiS, I’m sharing the Scots language found in my upcoming romantic suspense novel, Running the Asset.

Let’s dive right in and get to this week’s word–well, it’s a phrase in the snippet.

Here’s the snippet… (unedited first draft)

He gripped Elle’s chin, forcing her to look up at him. “The morra’s morn, you’re going to get that drive for me, and then I suggest you get the fuck out of Marseille.”

Incensed eyes pinned him. “No.”

A lesser man would have withered under the waves of anger coming off her, but Adam remained unmoved. So she hated him; it was no skin off his nose. He wasn’t too fond of her either. “No?”

“No.”

“Fine. Let’s see how you feel in the morning.” He tugged at her restraints, then gave her the smile he’d been told would get him killed one day. “Don’t go anywhere, doll.” He left her tied to the chair as he walked out of her apartment.

Running the Asset (Deniable Unit #1)

Let’s break the phrase down. Morra is more common in the Central dialect of Scots, and it means tomorrow–it’s usually said as the morra. Morn means morning. Put it all together, and we get the morra’s morn meaning tomorrow morning.

[FYI: If Adam spoke another dialect of Scots, say North East/The Doric, he’d have said the/e morn’s morn to mean the same thing.]

And that’s it

I hope you enjoyed this post. I’d love to hear your comments on how easy or difficult it was to get the gist of the morra’s morn as it appeared in the quote. 

If you find yourself inspired by the Scots words I share, add the tag #TiS or #ThingsinScots to your writing/art/photo post and drop your link in the comments.

If you want to see more Scots posts, check out the original series, Things in Scots.

Thanks for reading. Take care, and I hope to see you next week for more Scots on Manuscript Mondays!

Things in Scots: Running the Asset Edition – Lugs

Welcome to the second post in the revamped Things in Scots series. In this incarnation of TiS, I’m sharing the Scots language found in my upcoming romantic suspense novel, Running the Asset.

My aims for this series are to share my first language and to sneak in a wee bit of beta testing. Think of it as a cheaty way of making sure that the Scots words are easy to understand via context rather than explanations. Unless the explanation route is natural to the story and/or leads to sexy times (that could/might/totally will happen).

This week’s snippet might look familiar to some of you. Part of it appeared on the site in October last year in full/braid Scots as part of the Scotstober challenge for the word dreich.

Here’s the snippet… (unedited first draft)

Heat. Flames. The bone-shaking roar. The blast ripped through the air, knocking Adam hard to the ground. He tried to lever himself off the ground, but his vision was doing a slow spin to the relentless ringing in his lugs.

He tried again only to have the wind knocked out of him by something sent barrelling by the stampeeding crowd. With rough hands, Adam rolled the dead weight off him to the pavement. Shit. The terror stricken eyes of a teenaged lassie stared up at him from a blood stained face.

Running the Asset (Deniable Unit #1)

Okay, this is actually a Scots word twofer. First is lugs which is the Scots for ears. The second is lassie, which I think most folks know is one of the many Scots words for girl.

And that’s it

I hope you enjoyed this post. I’d love to hear your comments on how easy or difficult it was to get the gist of lugs and lassie as they appeared in the quote. 

I said last time that this wasn’t exactly a challenge series, but I’ve decided to go with making it one. So, if you find yourself inspired by the Scots words I share, add the tag #TiS or #ThingsinScots to your writing/art/photo post and drop your link in the comments.

If you want to see more Scots posts, check out the original series, Things in Scots.

Thanks for reading. Take care, and I hope to see you next week for more Scots on Manuscript Mondays!

Things in Scots: Running the Asset Edition

Things in Scots is finally back after its two year break! But, there’s a twist. This time, it’s personal…well, eh, kinda? Take a keek at how I’m using Scots in my modern romantic suspense novel.

Happy New Year! I hope 2022 finds you all well. I’m finally venturing out of my cave with a post series I’ve been dying to work on.

In 2019, I teamed up with my wonderful husband, Jez, on our Scots Language project, Things in Scots. Unfortunately, with ever-increasing demands on our time, the project got shelved. Ever since then, I’ve been itching to get back to sharing Scots.

In October 2021, I finally saw the perfect opportunity when Dr Michael Dempster announced on Twitter that there would be a daily Scots language challenge called Scotstober.

I wasn’t sure I’d be able to keep up with the challenge but decided to give it a go, jumping in at the last moment. I’m so glad I did, as I loved the experience of writing entirely in Scots. 

Unfortunately, the daily posting on top of writing Running the Asset took its toll on my health—CRPS—and it’s taken a lot for me to get back to posting to the blog. 

Which brings me to this post

While I was doing Scotstober, an idea for bringing back Things in Scots struck me. Why not share the bits of the Scots language from my work in progress? 

As most of my target audience speaks English and hasn’t much experience with Scots, I’ve written my manuscript in English. My Scots heroes dae drap wee bits o the language in, here and there. But, I’ve tried to avoid the need to have the characters explain the words by relying on context (though some phrases the heroes do explain).

So, here’s the first snippet… (apologies, this is an unedited first draft)

“He’s heading North, K.” Adam sprinted in that direction.

“Got him,” Killian said over the comms. “He’s nearing the shopping centre. Take the next left and go in through the multistory parking. You can intercept him before he gets lost in the crowd.”

Adam pumped his arms and legs, willing them to go faster. He skitit around the corner, almost hitting the opposite wall as he lost traction on the gravel.

Running the Asset (Deniable Unit #1)

Skitit is the past tense of skite (check out my post on skite). Skite means to slide, slip, go fast—and much more—and is pronounced skiyt.

Skitit is pronounced skiy-tih. You’ll notice that the t at the end isn’t sounded. Well, that’s not entirely true. It’s a glottal stop, so the sound comes from the throat.

And that’s it

I hope you enjoyed this post. I’d love to hear your comments on how easy or difficult it was to get the gist of skitit as it appeared in the quote. 

This isn’t exactly a challenge series, but if you find yourself inspired by the Scots words I share, add the tag #TiS or #ThingsinScots to your writing/art/photo post and drop your link in the comments.

Thanks for reading. Take care, and I hope to see you next week for more Scots on Manuscript Mondays!

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